Farmer’s Wife 1930’s – Granny and Jenny

 

It feels like we are flying through the weeks of the The Farmer’s Wife 1930s Sampler Quilt sew-along… two sweet blocks this week, both of them constructed in a very similar manner using triangles rather than squares. I have included photos of the backs of them both, as pressing the seams in a particular way for each piece made a very real difference in terms of my seams nesting and points joining up right where they were supposed to. Again, in order for the centre to lay flat, I “spun” my centre seam, which avoids the nasty lump that all those points intersecting can cause. Is anyone interested in a more detailed tutorial on this technique?

 

First off for the week was Block 41, Granny. Find Angie’s tutorial for this block HERE and Rachel’s from Wooden Spoon Quilts HERE.

 

FW41_Granny_CassandraMadge

 

Granny was a real sweetie. She is a little old fashioned with her vintage daisies, but always a welcome sight.

 

Farmer's Wife 1930's 41 Granny - Cassandra Madge

 

Looking at the back of the block, you may notice that I constructed it into triangle points. First I alternated pressing the small triangle seams to the solid or the print side, so they nested when joined together. Next I seamed the four large triangle sections together. These seams only I pressed open. Finally I joined the block along the diagonal seams, first into halves, then into the finished block. Because of alternating those tiny seams in the beginning, all the inner square seams nested nicely for this step.

 

Next we have block 45, Jenny. Find Angie’s tutorial for Jenny HERE, as well as tutorials by Tonya from Crafty Mummy HERE and Peta of She Quilts a Lot HERE

 

FW45_Jenny_CassandraMadge

 

Here is sweet Jenny in roses and gingham. Although I used three different shades of blue in this block, surprisingly they all work beautifully together.

 

Farmer's wife 1930's 45 Jenny - Cassandra Madge

 

You can see in the back of Jenny, above, that I pressed all her seams to the side. First joining the outer solid triangles to the sides of the gingham pieces, then stitching the inner triangle, either solid or print, onto the top of the previous section. By alternating that seam either to the inside or outside, when I put the pieces together the points nested nicely and didn’t get cut off.  Finally I joined the large triangle sections along the diagonal seams, the same as Granny, above. Those seams were all pressed to go around in a the same direction and Jenny stitched together in record time. I’m so happy with how she came out.

 

For both of these blocks I used the Marti Michell templates – including for the small triangles in Granny even though they were a little bigger than Lori’s original piecing instructions. Life is too short to worry about the details, right Granny? I am very grateful that Marti and her team shared these with me for my work as an official blogger, and I am completely head over heels in love with the results that I get from using them. My opinion is most definitely my own!

 

If you have any questions about the sew along, don’t forget that Angie has created a thorough list of Frequently Asked Questions on her blog. You can check it out HERE.

 

 

How’s your farm looking now? I hope it’s colourful like mine! Don’t stress about falling behind, it’s a long year there will be plenty of chances to catch up! If you’re nervous about colour choices or fabric selections, check out all the amazing blocks being posted on Instagram or Facebook – you’re sure to find some inspiration there!

 

 

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 Happy Crafting - Cassie.

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4 Responses

  1. Caroline

    “Is anyone interested in a more detailed tutorial on this technique?”
    Yes please!!! Despite seeing pictures and reading a few explanations, I just can’t seem to get my head around this technique. I would LOVE a detailed tutorial!

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